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Effect of Extractives on Pulping

  • W. E. Hillis
  • M. Sumimoto
Part of the Springer Series in Wood Science book series (SSWOO)

Abstract

Paper used for writing, printing, and drawing has been made from fibers from various sources for centuries. With the increasing importance of paper in the past two centuries, the supply of raw materials then used became inadequate for the need, and attention was given to alternative supplies. Wood gained importance as a source of fiber in 1844 when grinding wood to pulp was introduced and subsequently when chemical processes were also used. Now, globally, wood supplies more than 94% of pulp fiber and in countries such as the United States, the amount is higher than 98%.

Keywords

Ellagic Acid Wood Property Kraft Pulp Resin Acid Black Liquor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. E. Hillis
  • M. Sumimoto

There are no affiliations available

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