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Part of the book series: Springer Series in Wood Science ((SSWOO))

Abstract

The condensed tannins, together with hydrolyzable tannins (gallic acid metabolites, described in Sect. 7.2) constitute the vegetable tannins, which have the essential characteristic of binding proteins and, less familiarly, polysaccharides. It is this feature of their chemistry that has been of continuing fascination for scientists, and has provided much of the impetus for their study. Recent work has shown that a minor role in plants probably involves their broad-spectrum antibiotic properties (see Sect. 7.7.5) and this is also likely to involve their binding characteristics (see Sect. 7.7.2.3).

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© 1989 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Porter, L.J. (1989). Condensed Tannins. In: Rowe, J.W. (eds) Natural Products of Woody Plants. Springer Series in Wood Science. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-74075-6_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-74075-6_18

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