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Critical Time After Reversible Drain Ischemia for Pentobarbital Administration in the Gerbil

  • B. B. Mršulja
  • B. J. Mršulja
  • B. M. Djuričič
  • W. D. Lust
  • M. Spatz
Conference paper

Abstract

Recently, we found that pentobarbital (PENTO) delayed but did not prevent depletion of energy metabolites and accumulation of lactate in the ischemic brain (Mršulja et al. 1984). However, barbiturates have been reported to possess a protective effect against some pathological sequelae which arise following an ischemic/anoxic episode; nevertheless, the specific mechanism for the protective effect of barbiturates against brain ischemia remains unclear (Shapiro 1985). Barbiturates are the drugs of choice for the inhibition of synaptic transmission (Astrup 1982). Also, it has been shown that barbiturates decrease the excitability of the brain by intensifying the GABAergic system (Richter and Holtman 1982) and by affecting calcium homeostasis (Heyer and MacDonald 1982). Since PENTO given before or immediately after 5 min of ischemia prevents or ameliorates destruction of hippocampal CA1 sector neurons in the gerbils at 4 days of recirculation after 5 min bilateral carotid occlusion, which was not seen when the drug was administrated 2 hr after ischemia (Mršulja et al. 1987), we were interested in the possible biochemical background of this phenomenon.

Keywords

Brain Ischemia GABAergic System Pathological Neurochemistry Cerebral Vascular Disease Energy Metabolite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. B. Mršulja
    • 1
  • B. J. Mršulja
    • 1
  • B. M. Djuričič
    • 1
  • W. D. Lust
    • 2
  • M. Spatz
    • 3
  1. 1.Section on Pathological Neurochemistry and NeuropharmacologyInstitute of Biochemistry, School of MedicineBelgradeYugoslavia
  2. 2.Laboratory of Experimental NeurosurgeryCWR UniversityClevelandUSA
  3. 3.LNNS, NINDSNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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