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Reduction of Intracranial Hypertension with Free Radical Scavengers

  • R. S. Zimmerman
  • J. P. Muizelaar
  • E. P. Wei
  • H. A. Kontos

Abstract

Intracranial hypertension after severe head injury continues to remain a serious problem affecting morbidity and mortality. Excluding space occupying lesions, the etiology of raised ICP is due to either vascular engorgement (brain swelling) or brain edema. Engorgement occurs when there is a loss of the normal regulation of vascular tone, resulting in cerebrovascular dilatation. Brain edema can occur from increased vascular permeability, producing a vasogenic component of extracellular fluid. Free radical scavengers have demonstrated protective effects against both dilatation and increased permeability of the cerebral vasculature in response to various experimental insults. Based on this evidence, it was postulated that prevention of free radical mediated injury might attenuate the development of intracranial hypertension.

Keywords

Free Radical Scavenger Brain Edema Intracranial Hypertension Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. S. Zimmerman
    • 1
  • J. P. Muizelaar
    • 1
  • E. P. Wei
    • 2
  • H. A. Kontos
    • 2
  1. 1.Divisions of NeurosurgeryMedical College of VirginiaRichmondUSA
  2. 2.CardiologyMedical College of VirginiaRichmondUSA

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