Oral Contraceptives and Lipid Metabolism

  • T. Rabe
  • K. Grunwald
  • L. Kiesel
  • B. Runnebaum
Conference paper

Abstract

The most important causes of higher mortality in users of oral contraceptives (OC) due to cardiovascular diseases such as thromboembolic insults, myocardial infarction and cerebral insults are related to changes in metabolism: changes in lipid metabolism with development of atherosclerosis, changes in carbohydrate metabolism with development of a chemical diabetes mellitus, and deterioration of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system leading to hypertension, changes in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and morphological changes of blood vessels. These changes are caused predominantly by environmental factors (e. g., nutrition, physical activity, and standard of living) and less by genetic factors.

Keywords

Carbohydrate Estrogen Nicotine Testosterone Smoke 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Rabe
    • 1
  • K. Grunwald
    • 1
  • L. Kiesel
    • 1
  • B. Runnebaum
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecological Endocrinology, Women’s HospitalUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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