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Effect of Some Metal Ions (Cd++, Pb++, Mn++) on Mediator Release from Mast Cells in Vivo and in Vitro

  • H. Behrendt
  • M. Wieczorek
  • S. Wellner
  • A. Winzer

Abstract

Mast cells are tissue bound mononuclear granulated cells deriving from the pluripotential hematopoietic stem cell (1). The cells can be easily identified by the strong affinity of their granules to basic dyes, i.e. toluidine blue and alcian blue at low pH. By electronmicroscopy mast cells exhibit specific granules which are characterized by a special, species-dependent matrix substructure. Mast cells are located at the border of inner and outer surfaces within mammalian organisms, and they are said to play an important role in maintaining physiological microenvironmental conditions via regulating vascular permeability through histamine and other mediators.

Keywords

Mast Cell Histamine Release Manganese Dioxide Mediator Release Calcium Ionophore A23187 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Behrendt
    • 1
  • M. Wieczorek
    • 1
  • S. Wellner
    • 1
  • A. Winzer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ElectronmicroscopyMedical Institute of Environmental Hygiene at the University of DüsseldorfDüsseldorfGermany

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