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Nutritional Factors Affecting Fusarium Wilt Incidence and Severity

  • A. W. Engelhard
  • J. P. Jones
  • S. S. Woltz
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 28)

Abstract

Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f. sp. lycopersici (Sacc.) Snyder and Hansen) of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was first reported in the United States in 1899 by E.F. Smith who said that the disease had put an end to the growing of tomatoes for the northern markets in certain areas of Florida. By 1920, the disease had become widespread and destructive throughout the southeast, midwest, and middle Atlantic states (Walker 1971).

Keywords

Fusarium Oxysporum Fusarium Wilt Calcium Nitrate Soil Fumigant Plant Disease Reporter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. W. Engelhard
    • 1
  • J. P. Jones
    • 1
  • S. S. Woltz
    • 1
  1. 1.Gulf Coast Research & Education CenterUniversity of FloridaBradentonUSA

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