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Does the presence of an associated stenosis modify the principle of the operation proposed?

  • A. Watson
Conference paper

Abstract

Whilst the precise incidence of associated stenosis in Barrett’s esophagus is unclear, it is known that approximately 75% of all high strictures are associated with columnarisation [1, 2] and tend to occur at the squamo-columnar junction. The observation that strictures frequently occur in the most florid refluxers with predominantly supine reflux [3], in the presence of motility disorders [4] and in the presence of alkaline reflux [5] emphasize the need for careful pre-treatment evaluation, the results of which may modify the management policy.

Keywords

Esophageal Stricture Surgical Problem Colon Interposition Benign Esophageal Stricture Collis Gastroplasty 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Watson
    • 1
  1. 1.LancasterUK

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