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The Transfer of Medical Technology in Developing Countries: The Case of Brazil

  • H. D. Banta
Part of the Health Systems Research book series (HEALTH)

Abstract

The image of developing countries is sometimes that they lack modern technologies. This does not necessarily give a true picture. For example, in Mexico a study of 17 medical technologies, including amniocentesis, cardiac catheterisation, fiberoptic endoscopy, electronic fetal monitoring, computed tomography, and micro-surgery, found that they were widely distributed in the country. In the 157 hospitals surveyed, 106 had intensive care units (Rodriguez Dominguez et al. 1984). In Uruguay, five types of services are provided to the entire population through a special national fund: open-heart surgery, pacemaker implant, chronic renal dialysis, kidney transplant, and hip replacement. While these are two of the richest countries in Latin America, they do illustrate that ’high’ technology is an important part of health care delivery in the developing world. In fact, the health systems of developing countries are generally hospital and specialist intensive.

Keywords

Medical Technology Spare Part National Industry International Development Research Fiberoptic Endoscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. D. Banta

There are no affiliations available

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