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External References of the Bicommissural Plane

  • U. Bergvall
  • C. Rumeau
  • Y. Van Bunnen
  • J. M. Corbaz
  • M. Morel

Abstract

A fundamental principle expressed by Lindgren [10] states that radiology should be conducted so as to provide anatomical sections in vivo. In clinical neuroradiology this principle is applied within a wide range of variation in accuracy, primarily dependent on clinical demand. The practical limits of accuracy in determining topographic relationships between various structures of the brain are approached in stereotaxic work for localisation and treatment purposes. The basis of the stereotaxic principle is the establishment of spatial and topographic interrelationship of normal and abnormal structures in the brain, normalised to a frame of reference with external or internal landmarks. Therefore any discussion of such landmarks, in order to be of more than mere academic interest, must incorporate experiences made accessible in stereotaxic practice.

Keywords

External Reference Posterior Commissure External Auditory Meatus Outer Canthus Midsagittal Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Bergvall
  • C. Rumeau
  • Y. Van Bunnen
  • J. M. Corbaz
  • M. Morel

There are no affiliations available

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