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Intrapulmonary Pretreatment by Metal-Fume Components Causing Inhibition of Delayed Hypersensitivity

  • L. Q. de A Caldas
  • R. Hicks
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Toxicology, Supplement book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 11)

Abstract

Earlier experiments have demonstrated that cutaneous hypersensitivity evoked by components from stainless steel welding fumes, such as chromium or nickel, may be inhibited by treatment with these haptens, given by intratracheal, intrapulmonary or oral administration prior to the sensitization procedure (Hicks and Caldas 1985). The inhibitory effects were interpreted as manifestations of tolerance. Further investigations were performed to decide which component of the welding-fume particles contributes most to such tolerance. These properties have previously been tested using potassium dichromate. However, the form of chromium in stainless steel metal fumes is predominantly as the chromate, which interacts with protein by a tanning-like process differing from that of dichromate. It was therefore desirable to verify that chromate could also induce tolerance. It was desirable also to investigate nickel, as this did not appear to produce consistent effects.

Keywords

Potassium Dichromate Stainless Steel Welding Welding Fume Nickel Salt Potassium Chromate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Hicks R, Caldas LQA (1986) Immunologic unresponsiveness to chromium or nickel in the guinea-pig induced by stainless steel welding fume components. Arch Toxicol Suppl. 9:421–422CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Polak L (1985) Antigenic competition in the induction of contact sensitivity in the guinea pig. Int Archs Allergy Appl Immunol 76:275–281CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Polak L, Turk JL, Frey JR (1973) Studies on contact hypersensitivity to chromium compounds. Prog Allergy 17:145–226PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Q. de A Caldas
    • 1
  • R. Hicks
    • 1
  1. 1.Metal-Fume Research Group, School of Studies in PharmacologyUniversity of BradfordBradfordUK

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