Plastic reconstructive surgery in patients with end-stage peripheral arterial disease

  • K. Van Landuyt
  • S. Monstrey
  • G. Matton
  • F. Vermassen
  • J. De Roose
Conference paper

Abstract

Despite aggressive approaches to revascularization of the lower extremity, many ischemic lesions still result in amputation. Causes of lower extremity amputation include nonreconstructible peripheral occlusive disease, failed arterial reconstructions and/or infected gangrenous lesions extending into underlying tendon or bone, even after successful revascularization.

Keywords

Ischemia Neuropathy Dehydration Osteomyelitis Padding 

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References

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Van Landuyt
    • 1
  • S. Monstrey
  • G. Matton
    • 1
  • F. Vermassen
  • J. De Roose
    • 2
  1. 1.Deparment of Plastic and Reconstructive SurgeryUniversity Hospital GhentGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Dept. of Vascular SurgeryUniversity Hospital GhentBelgium

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