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Oxalate and calcium absorption tests in patients after jejunoileal anastomosis and in idiopathic renal stone formers in comparison with healthy subjects

  • Monica Lindsjö
  • B. G. Danielson
  • B. Fellström
  • H. Lithell
  • S. Ljunghall
  • E. Skarfors
  • B. Vessby
Conference paper
Part of the Fortschritte der Urologie und Nephrologie book series (2824, volume 25)

Abstract

Calcium oxalate is the main constituent of about 60–85% of all renal stones (1–3). The concentration of calcium and oxalate in urine are major risk factors for the formation of renal stones (4). Renal excretion of oxalate has been reported to be increased in patients with idiopathic stone disease (5). Patients who have undergone jejunoileal bypass in order to control extensive obesity are prone to develop hyperoxaluria and renal calcium stones. In a study by Backman, 18% of the patients developed renal stones after operation (6).

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag, GmbH & Co. KG., Darmstadt 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monica Lindsjö
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. G. Danielson
    • 2
  • B. Fellström
    • 2
  • H. Lithell
    • 3
  • S. Ljunghall
    • 2
  • E. Skarfors
    • 3
  • B. Vessby
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden
  3. 3.Department of GeriatricsUppsalaSweden

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