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Responses to Water and Nutrients in Coniferous Ecosystems

  • S. Linder
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 61)

Abstract

In most temperate environments the major limiting factors for forest production are water and/or nutrients. Both factors greatly influence the amount of foliage produced by a stand and consequently have a direct effect upon the amount of radiation that is intercepted.

Keywords

Basal Area Leaf Area Index Basal Area Increment Young Stand Needle Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

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  • S. Linder

There are no affiliations available

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