Mammalian Cell Transformation by a Recombinant Murine Retrovirus Containing the Avian Erythroblastosis Virus erbB Gene

  • J. H. Pierce
  • A. Gazit
  • P. P. Di Fiore
  • M. Kraus
  • C. Y. Pennington
  • K. L. Holmes
  • W. F. Davidson
  • H. C. MorseIII
  • S. A. Aaronson
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 132)

Abstract

Avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) is a replication-defective retrovirus which induces erythroblastosis, sarcomas and carcinomas in chickens and transforms immature avian erythroid and fibroblastic cells in vitro (Graf and Beug, 1978). The genome of AEV contains two distinct oncogenes, v-erbA and v-erbB (Vennstrttm and Bishop, 1982). V-erbB is a member of the src family of retroviral oncogenes (Yamamoto et. al., 1983). The products of these src -related oncogenes as well as the receptors Tor several growth factors have been slown to exhibit tyrosine-specific kinase activity (Hunter and Cooper, 1985). Recently, it has been found that the v-erbB gene sequence possesses extensive homology with the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor gene (Downward et al., 1984). Analysis of the range of mammalian target cells susceptible to transformation by v-erbB has been impaired by difficulties in introducing this avian virus into mammalian cells. Therefore, we constructed a recombinant v-erbB-containing murine retrovirus which has allowed for more extensive investigation of the function of this EGF receptor-related gene as a transforming or growth-promoting gene in well defined mammalian systems.

Keywords

Hematopoietic Cell Hematopoietic Cell Line Poietic Cell Avian Sarcoma Virus Abelson Murine Leukemia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Abelson HT, Rabstein LS (1970) Lymphosarcoma: virus-induced thymic-independent disease in mice. Cancer Res 30: 2213–2222PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Bacheler L, Fan H (1981) Isolation of recombinant DNA clones carrying complete integrated proviruses of Moloney murine leukemia virus. J Virol 37: 181–190PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Bollum FT (1979) Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase as a hematopoietic cell marker. Blood 54: 1203–1215PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Chatis PA, Holland CA, Hartley JW, Rowe WP, Hopkins N (1983) Role for the 3’ end of the genome in determining disease specificity of Friend and Moloney murine leukemia viruses. Proc Natl Acad Sci 80: 4408–4411PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Coffman RL (1982) Surface antigen expression and immunoglobulin gene rearrangement during mouse pre-B cell development. Immunol Rev 69: 5PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. DesGroseillers L, Rassart E, Jolicoeur P (1983) Thymotropism of murine leukemia virus is conferred by its long terminal repeat. Proc Natl Acad Sci 80: 4203–4207PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Downward J, Yarden Y, Mayes E, Scrace G, Totty N, Stockwell P, Schlessinger J, Waterfield MD (1984) Close similarity of epidermal growth factor receptor and v-erbB oncogene protein sequences. Nature 307: 521: 527Google Scholar
  8. Frykberg L, Palmieri S, Beug H, Graf T, Hayman MJ, Vennstrom B (1983) Transforming capacities of avian erythroblastosis virus mutants deleted in the erbA or erbB oncogenes. Cell 32: 227–238PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Graf T, Beug H (1978) Avian leukemia viruses: interaction with their target cells in vivo and in vitro. Biochim Biophys Acta 516: 269–299PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Hankins DW, Scolnick EM (1981) Harvey and Kirsten sarcoma viruses promote the growth and differentiation of erythroid precursor cells in vitro. Cell 26: 91–97PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hunter T, Cooper JA (1985) Protein-tyrosine kinases. Annu Rev Biochem 54: 897–930PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Kahn P, Adkins B, Beug H, Graf T (1984) Src- and fps-containing avian sarcoma viruses transform chicken erythroid ceTTs. Proc Natl Acad Sci 81: 7122–7126Google Scholar
  13. Kerbel RS, Pross HF, Elliot EY (1975) Origin and partial characterization of Fc receptor-bearing cells found within experimental carcinomas and sarcomas. Int J Cancer 15: 918–932PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Sealy L, Privalsky ML, Moscovici G, Moscovici C, Bishop JM (1983) Site-specific mutagenesis of avian erythroblastosis virus: erbB is required for oncogenicity. Virology 130: 155–178PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Siden E, Baltimore D, Clark P, Rosenberg N (1979) Immunoglobulin synthesis by lymphoid cells transformed in vitro by Abel son murine leukemia virus. Cell 16: 389–396PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Vennström B, Bishop JM (1982) Isolation and characterization of chicken DNA homologous to the two putative oncogenes of avian erythroblastosis virus. Cell 28: 135–143PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Vennström B, Fanshier L, Moscovici C, Bishop JM (1980) Molecular cloning of the avian erythroblastosis virus genome and recovery of oncogenic virus by transfection of chicken cells. J Virol 36: 575–585PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Yamamoto T, Nishida T, Miyajima N, Kawai S, Oi T, Toyoshima K (1983) The erbB gene of avian erythroblastosis virus is a member of the src gene family. Cell 35: 71–78PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Pierce
    • 1
  • A. Gazit
    • 1
  • P. P. Di Fiore
    • 1
  • M. Kraus
    • 1
  • C. Y. Pennington
    • 1
  • K. L. Holmes
    • 2
  • W. F. Davidson
    • 2
  • H. C. MorseIII
    • 2
  • S. A. Aaronson
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular BiologyNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of ImmunopathologyNational Cancer InstituteBethesdaUSA

Personalised recommendations