A Growth Factor Required by Plasmacytoma Cells In Vitro

  • R. P. Nordan
  • L. M. Neckers
  • S. Rudikoff
  • M. Potter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 132)

Abstract

In BALB/c mice, plasmacytomas (PCT) arise and proliferate in the granulomatous tissue that forms in response to the intraperitoneal administration of pristane (Potter and Boyce, 1962; Anderson and Potter, 1969). Studies by Cancro and Potter (1976) suggest that the oil granuloma provides a special microenvironment which is necessary for the growth of early PCT’s. Although the specific contributions of this microenvironment are unknown, in vitro studies suggest that PCT’s that have not been adapted previously to cell culture require added factors for in vitro growth and proliferation. Namba and Hanaoka (1972) described a 50 kDa macrophage-derived protein that was required for the in vitro growth of the M0PC104E PCT. Metcalf (1974) demonstrated that mouse serum or peritoneal macrophages supported the clonal growth of PCT’s in soft agar. Recently, Corbel and Mel chers (1984) reported that “alpha factor-containing” supernatant from the P388D1 cell line also supported the in vitro growth of several PCT’s. We have recently reported the establishment of PCT cell lines that are totally dependent on a factor for survival and proliferation in vitro (Nordan and Potter, 1986). We discuss here our initial biological and biochemical characterizations of this factor.

Keywords

P388D1 Cell Plasmacytoma Cell Added Factor Thymosin Fraction Stimulate Colony Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Nordan
    • 1
  • L. M. Neckers
    • 2
  • S. Rudikoff
    • 1
  • M. Potter
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of GeneticsNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of PathologyNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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