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Physiology and Pathophysiology of Reciprocal Inhibition in the Human Forearm

  • B. L. Day
  • J. C. Rothwell
  • J. A. Obeso
  • P. Thompson
  • A. Cozens
  • C. D. Marsden
Part of the Advances in Applied Neurological Sciences book series (NEUROLOGICAL, volume 4)

Abstract

Active inhibition of antagonist muscles during voluntary movement is accomplished largely from two sources: by central descending commands from the brain and by peripheral input from agonist muscle spindle Ia afferents. Work on animals has demonstrated that both the central and peripheral sources of inhibition act through the same system of spinal Ia inhibitory interneurones (see [1]).

Keywords

Radial Nerve Voluntary Movement Cortical Stimulation Reciprocal Inhibition Focal Dystonia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. L. Day
    • 1
  • J. C. Rothwell
    • 1
  • J. A. Obeso
    • 1
  • P. Thompson
    • 1
  • A. Cozens
    • 1
  • C. D. Marsden
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyInstitute of PsychiatryLondonUK

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