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Susceptibility of Mus musculus musculus (Czech I) Mice to Salmonella typhimurium Infection

  • A. D. O’Brien
  • D. L. Weinstein
  • L. A. D’Hoostelaere
  • M. Potter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 127)

Abstract

When inbred or outbred mice are challenged with Salmonella typhimurium, they develop a disease which is similar in its pathogenesis to typhoid fever in man. Whether the animals ultimately survive the infection depends on the virulence of the bacterial strain, the route of challenge, and the genetic constitution of the mice. Although mice of some inbred strains and many outbred strains survive parenteral inoculation with up to 10,000 virulent salmonellae, mice of other inbred strains invariably succumb to low-dose (< 10 bacteria) challenge. Several distinct host genes have been identified which regulate this differential susceptibility to murine typhoid. Some of these genes act early in the course of the disease (Ity, Lps, and the C3HeB/FeJ gene), and mice that express the, susceptibility allele at any one of these loci (e.g., Ity S or Lps d ) usually die by day 10 of infection with a virulent strain of S. typhimurium (Plant and Glynn 1976; Hormaeche 1979; O’Brien et al. 1980, O’Brien and Rosenstreich 1983).

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Inbred Strain Typhoid Fever Genetic Constitution Inbred Mouse Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Hormaeche CE (1979) Natural resistance to Salmonella typhimurium in different inbred mouse strains. Immunology 37:311–318PubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. O’Brien
  • D. L. Weinstein
  • L. A. D’Hoostelaere
  • M. Potter

There are no affiliations available

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