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DNA-Mediated Restoration of Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylase Induction in a Mouse Hepatoma Mutant Defective in Nuclear Translocation of the Ah Receptor

  • S. O. Kärenlampi
  • D. F. Montisano
  • J. M. Gudas
  • O. Hankinson
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 9)

Abstract

In order to study the induction mechanism of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), non-inducible mutants have previously been isolated from the mouse hepatoma cell line, Hepa-1. With the ultimate goal of isolating the corresponding genes, restoration of AHH inducibility to representative mutants by means of DNA-mediated gene transfer has been set out. The succesful transfection of a C mutant, which is defective in nuclear translocation of the Ah receptor-inducer complex, is described here, using rat genomic DNA as donor material. Primary and secondary rat transfectants were obtained, and they were assayed for hydroxylase activity, receptor translocation, and homology with a rat repetitive DNA sequence.

Key words

Aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase Benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase Cytochrome P1-450 Cell culture Transfection 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. O. Kärenlampi
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. F. Montisano
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. M. Gudas
    • 1
    • 2
  • O. Hankinson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of KuopioKuopio 21Finland
  2. 2.The Laboratory of Biomedical and Environmental SciencesUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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