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Endotoxin-Induced Shock in the Pregnant Miniature Pig — Changes in Macro- and Microcirculation

  • J. Hauss
  • E. H. Schmidt
  • H. U. Spiegel
  • B. Flötotto
  • W. Holzgreve
  • F. K. Beller
  • H. Bünte
Conference paper

Abstract

In 1935, Apitz induced a generalized Shwartzman phenomenon (bilateral renal cortex necrosis, hemorrhagic diathesis, and shock) in rabbits by giving them two injections of endotoxin at a 24-h interval. He observed that one animal had already died after the first injection. This animal was pregnant [1]. Based on this observation, numerous investigations were carried out which proved that animals in the last third of their gestation period generally require a lower dose of endotoxin to develop shock than nonpregnant control animals. The results all indicated that pregnancy has a predisposing effect for generalized Shwartzman phenomenon and for shock.

Keywords

Central Venous Pressure Stroke Index Endotoxin Shock Shock Index Partial Carbon Dioxide Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Hauss
  • E. H. Schmidt
  • H. U. Spiegel
  • B. Flötotto
  • W. Holzgreve
  • F. K. Beller
  • H. Bünte

There are no affiliations available

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