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Determination of the Cellular Uptake of Daunorubicin in Human Leukemia in vivo: Method of Examination and First Results

  • M. E. Scheulen
  • K. Lennartz
  • T. Heidrich
  • G. Host
  • B. Kramer
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 30)

Abstract

Daunorubicin (DNM) and other anthracycline antibiotics are among the most active agents in the cytostatic chemotherapy of acute leukemias and are widely used in clinical oncology. Their clinical use is limited by toxic side effects such as cardiotoxicity and by the development of resistance, respectively. Clinical pharmacology is one of the tools to determine and possibly predict antitumor efficacy as well as toxicity of antineoplastic drugs in man. As the cellular pharmacology of cytostatics in tumor cells and organ tissues may better contribute to the understanding of the antineoplastic effect and the toxic side effects of cytostatic chemotherapy and thus may better predict drug resistance individually, attempts are necessary to develop appropriate methods in man in vivo. The repeated aquirement of tumor cells to establish kinetics of intracellular drug content is ethically justified and can be easily performed only in patients with leukocytic leukemias.

Keywords

Cellular Uptake Acute Leukemia Toxic Side Effect Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell Plasma Kinetic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Scheulen
    • 1
  • K. Lennartz
    • 2
  • T. Heidrich
    • 1
  • G. Host
    • 1
  • B. Kramer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine (Cancer Research)West German Tumor Center, University of Essen Medical SchoolEssenFederal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Institute for Cell Biology (Cancer Research)West German Tumor Center, University of Essen Medical SchoolEssenFederal Republic of Germany

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