Insect Flight pp 265-280 | Cite as

The Four Kinds of Migration

  • L. R. Taylor
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

The papers presented here cover a wide range of aspects of insect migration, from genetical and biochemical through physiological and behavioural to ecological, aerodynamical, and agricultural. This range makes fascinating general reading. It is a topical survey and statement of how the subject of migration has developed in entomology, especially over the last 30 years and how it now appears to entomologists. It brings Johnson’ss (1969) great compendium up to date in many fields. Much of it is recognizably descended from that impressive work, even when the authors may not be aware of it.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. R. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Harpenden, HertfordshireUK

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