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Complex Odontoma

  • Joachim Prein
  • Wolfgang Remagen
  • Bernd Spiessl
  • Erwin Uehlinger

Abstract

History. It is generally agreed in the literature that the term odontoma was introduced by Broca in 1868 (cf. Sprawson 1937; Eversole et al. 1971; Budnick 1976). For many years afterward a distinction was made between “hard” and “soft” odontomas, until Thoma and Goldman (1946) recognized “compound,” “complex composite,” “dilated,” and “cystic” odontomas in their classification of odontogenic tumors. The word “composite” was finally dropped in 1961 (Godin et al. 1961). In the WHO classification, tumors of the facial skeleton may be called odontomas only if they contain all constituents occurring in the normal tooth, i.e., enamel, dentine, cementum and pulpal tissue (Pindborg and Kramer 1971). Tumors that contain ameloblastoma-like structures in addition to these components are called ameloblastic odontomas (Chap. 11).

Synonym

Complex composite odontoma gestant composite odontoma. 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Prein
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Remagen
    • 2
  • Bernd Spiessl
    • 1
  • Erwin Uehlinger
    • 3
  1. 1.Departement Chirurgie, Kantonsspital BaselUniversitätsklinikenBaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.Institut für PathologieDer Universität BaselBaselSwitzerland
  3. 3.ehemals Pathologisches InstitutKantonsspital ZürichSwitzerland

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