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Evolutionary Biology of Intelligence: The Nature of the Problem

  • Harry J. Jerison
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 17)

Abstract

If our topic presents a problem, it is one of the good ones: like working a puzzle with a known solution. Most of us enjoy a tough puzzle, especially when we finally solve it. The challenge of the game of solving (or resolving) the “problem” of the evolution of intelligence has the added attraction that success will deepen our understanding of ourselves and of our world. We know enough about both intelligence and evolutionary biology to think sensibly about the intersection of these topics. Our problem is really our opportunity to enjoy the problem.

Keywords

Killer Whale Human Language Large Brain Harbor Porpoise Early Hominid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry J. Jerison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of California, Los Angeles, Medical SchoolLos AngelesUSA

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