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Effects of Amosite Fibers of Different Sizes on Lavagable Cells and Epithelial Permeability of the Lung

  • G. Oberdörster
  • S. H. Gavett
  • N. L. Marcello
  • S. R. Drago
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 3)

Abstract

Several investigators have studied the correlation between physical dimensions of asbestos fibers and their carcinogenic potency (e.g. Stanton and Wrench 1972; Pott and Friedrichs 1972; Wagner et al. 1973) and it has been hypothesized that asbestos fibers above 8 urn in length and below 1.5 μm in diameter are most effective in inducing tumors (Stanton et al. 1977). The validity for using fiber dimensions to describe their biological activity has been corroborated by findings about the induction of mesotheliomas in experimental animals by fibers of different composition. Those finding were the basis for the concept of durability of fibrous dusts in the tissue in addition to their physical dimensions to predict their long-term effects (Pott 1978; Stanton et al. 1977). Additional studies have also indicated the importance of fiber geometry for the development of asbestosis and for the acute in vitro toxicity of fibers (e.g. Beck et al 1971; Johnson and Davies 1980; Tilkes and Beck 1980). Greater fiber length seems to be correlated with greater toxicity both in vitro and in vivo (Chamberlain et al. 1980).

Keywords

Fiber Fraction Mineral Dust Asbestos Fiber Epithelial Permeability Mineral Fiber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Oberdörster
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. H. Gavett
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • N. L. Marcello
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. R. Drago
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Radiation Biology and BiophysicsUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Divison of ToxicologyUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Medical SchoolUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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