Electrochemical Methods and Their Limitations for the Determination of Metal Species in Natural Waters

Part of the Dahlem Workshop Reports book series (DAHLEM, volume 33)

Abstract

The use of ion-selective electrodes, polarography, anodic stripping voltammetry, and related techniques for studies of metal species is reviewed. Ion-selective electrodes measure the concentration of free metal and are particularly useful for toxicity studies and for the determination of the complexation capacity of fresh water. The polarographic and voltammetric methods measure the concentration of free metal as well as easily reducible (labile) metal complexes, whereas inert complexes are not detected. Anodic stripping voltammetry is particularly useful for the study of trace metal species in seawater at natural concentration levels. Several speciation schemes are discussed in which anodic stripping is used.

Keywords

Zinc Surfactant Toxicity Graphite Mercury 

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Copyright information

© Dr. S. Bernhard, Dahlem Konferenzen 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Lund
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of ChemistryUniversity of Oslo, BlindernOslo 3Norway

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