Glia of the Central Nervous System. Microglia (Modified from HAGER 1968)

  • Radivoj V. Krstić

Abstract

Following special impregnation methods, microglia, mesoglia, or Hortega cells (Figs. A1, B1), appear in all regions of the CNS, predominantly however near capillaries. Irregular, sometimes bushlike processes extend from the long cell body (Fig. A).

Keywords

Crest Rounded 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Radivoj V. Krstić
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut d’Histologie et d’EmbryologieUniversité de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

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