Gastroesophageal Reflux and Severe Mental Retardation

  • A. F. Schärli
Part of the Progress in Pediatric Surgery book series (PEDIATRIC, volume 18)

Abstract

Recurrent vomiting is very common in children with severe mental retardation. Nutritional deficiencies, anemia, and repeated bouts of aspiration pneumonitis impede the physical development of these children who already have motor defects. Often, this vomiting is written off as psychogenic, and a variety of methods are employed in attempts to overcome it, including antiemetic drugs, punishment, or a permanent nasogastric tube.

Keywords

Anemia Barium Dine Avant Esophagitis 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. F. Schärli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pediatric SurgeryChildren’s Hospital LucerneLuzernSwitzerland

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