Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Extracranial Cerebrovascular Disease as Measured by Stable Xenon CT

  • F. J. Schuier
  • C. Härtel
  • A. Hartmann
  • D. Göbel
  • A. Aulich

Abstract

Advanced atherosclerotic disease of extracranial cerebral arteries in patients with no or negligible neurologic deficit and no brain damage on CT have been identified by new noninvasive test batteries [1]. The correct therapy for these patients sometimes poses a problem, because even an optimal assessment of their vascular disease does not predict their hemodynamic effect on brain perfusion. For such cases a clinically applicable, noninvasive, local, and quantitative method to measure brain blood flow is desirable.

Keywords

Attenuation Iodine Respiration Xenon Phan 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. Schuier
    • 1
  • C. Härtel
    • 1
  • A. Hartmann
    • 2
  • D. Göbel
    • 2
  • A. Aulich
    • 2
  1. 1.Neurologische KlinikMedizinische Einrichtungen der UniversitätDüsseldorf 1Germany
  2. 2.Abteilung NeurologieUniversitäts-NervenklinikBonnGermany

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