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Neurology pp 223-228 | Cite as

Cerebrovascular Risk Factors

  • V. C. Hachinski
Conference paper

Abstract

Prevention offers the most efficacious management of cerebrovascular disease and the treatment of risk factors the most effective means of prevention. The 10% of people who sustain 50% of strokes can be identified through the presence of risk factors [10].

Keywords

Oral Contraceptive Bicuspid Aortic Valve Rheumatic Heart Disease Mitral Valve Prolapse Sick Sinus Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. C. Hachinski
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University HospitalUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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