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How are “Move” and “Hold” Programs Matched?

  • V. B. Brooks
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Motor control is going through a productive “crisis” of concept formation (Holton, 1973; cf. Brooks 1975; Granit, 1981). Research on movements and their neural control control is advancing so rapidly that new concepts have arisen even since the publication of recent “Handbooks” (e.g. Brooks, 1981; Towe and Luschei, 1981; Desmedt, 1983). In this article I adress a question that is implied in Holmes’ (1917) description of “decomposition of movements” after cerebellar damage: how does the cerebellum normally assist in the composition of intended movements? How are errors of direction, rate, and range avoided? Since posture and movements merge one into the other, the question is rephrased as: how does the cerebellum match “move” and “hold” programs? (Other functions of the cerebellum, including those with regard to non-programmed movements are not dealt with here, those considerations can be found in broader reviews (e.g. Bloedel and Courville, 1981; Brooks and Thach, 1981; Llinas, 1981).

Keywords

Cerebellar Dysfunction Elbow Movement Hand Path Intended Movement Program Match 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. B. Brooks
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of PhysiologyThe University of Western Ontario LondonCanada

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