Antigen Report: HLA-A24

  • D. P. Singal
  • M. D’Souza
  • H. Bétuel
  • L. Gebuhrer
Conference paper

Abstract

HLA-A24 was first identified as a split of A9 by Dausset in 1970 [4]. It was confirmed by the data analyzed at the 1972 Histocompatibility Workshop held in Evian [2]. At the last three workshops, A24 has been well defined with sera giving high correlation coefficients [3, 5, 6]. In addition, there was a good agreement between laboratories on the definition of this antigen in cell exchange [1]. A24 has the highest frequency in Orientals and the lowest in Negroids. In Caucasians, A24-Bw61-DR2 showed significant positive linkage disequilibrium, and in Orientals, A24-B7-DR2 showed strong negative linkage disequilibrium [6].

Keywords

Dick 

References

  1. 1.
    Bernoco D, Terasaki PI, Perdue S, et al (1980) International cell exchange report. In: Terasaki PI (ed) Histocompatibility testing 1980. UCLA Tissue Typing Laboratory, Los Angeles, p 215.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bodmer JG (1972) HL-A9. In: Dausset J, Colombani J (eds) Histocompatibility testing 1972. Munksgaard, Copenhagen, p 637Google Scholar
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    Bodmer JG (1975) The ABC of HLA. In: Kissmeyer-Nielsen F (ed) Histocompatibility testing 1975. Munksgaard, Copenhagen, p 21Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Dausset J (1971) The genetics of transplantation antigens. Transplant Proc 3: 8–14PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Dick HM (1977) HLA-A, B and C serology and antigen reports. In: Bodmer WF, et al (eds) Histocompatibility testing 1977. Munksgaard, Copenhagen, p 157Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Tait DB (1980) Aw24. In: Terasaki PI (ed) Histocompatibility testing 1980. UCLA Tissue Typing Laboratory, Los Angeles, p 305Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. P. Singal
    • 1
  • M. D’Souza
    • 1
  • H. Bétuel
    • 2
  • L. Gebuhrer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.Blood Transfusion CenterLyonFrance

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