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Evolutionary Management

  • F. Malik
  • G. Probst
Part of the Springer Series in Synergetics book series (SSSYN, volume 26)

Abstract

There are no reasonable grounds for doubting that all forms of life which exist today and which are very successfully adapted to their environment constitute the result of an evolutionary process stretching over millions of years. Order of all forms of life and of their complex interaction patterns has evolved during and as a result of the evolutionary process, while at the same time, producing and determining the direction of that process, a direction that we can recognize with hind sight.

Keywords

Evolutionary Theory Evolutionary Management Behavior Rule Unintended Side Effect Automaton Argument 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Malik
    • 1
  • G. Probst
    • 1
  1. 1.Hochschule für Wirtschafts- und SozialWissenschaftenInstitut für BetriebswirtschaftSt. GallenSwitzerland

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