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Motor Behavior pp 153-188 | Cite as

The Movement Speed-Accuracy Relationship in Space-Time

Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we synthesize extant descriptions of the movement speed-accuracy relationship and develop, from these orientations, a space-time approach to movement accuracy. This new space-time perspective provides a cohesive account of spatial and temporal movement error functions in the face of changing kinematics. The space-time function is posited as a statistical manifestation of the organismic, environmental, and task constraints inherent to the given action.

Keywords

Movement Time Movement Velocity Movement Amplitude Constant Error Spatial Error 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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