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Motor Behavior pp 125-151 | Cite as

The Control of Simple Movements by Multisensory Information

Chapter

Abstract

Simple movements are those with a clear beginning and a clear end, with an economical progression between the two. They have been much studied because their accuracy and timing can be measured comparatively easily, and the relationship between movement time and accuracy is the commonest statistic to be used in testing theories of the control of movement. One hopes that an understanding of simple movements can be generalised to improve our understanding of simple movements can be generalised to improve our understanding of complex movements, but simple movements are of practical as well as theoretical interest. Common acts such as kicking or throwing, picking up objects and putting them down, pointing or aiming are all simple movements.

Keywords

Experimental Psychology Variable Error Movement Time Constant Error Ment Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

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