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Automated Autoradiographic Analysis of Tumor Cell Colonies in vitro

  • Robert F. Kallman
Conference paper

Abstract

The studies reported below are basic to the design of therapeutic strategies against cancer and to the understanding of therapeutic effects. It is unlikely that clinical therapy could employ the same methodology, however, so this approach could not be incorporated into “kinetics-directed” therapy. As defined and implemented successfully by Barranco et al. (1982a, b), therapy is kinetics-directed when the kinetic properties of cell populations under treatment are actually determined and used to schedule the timing of multiple treatments. Thus, the substance of this paper is of potential importance to kinetics-based cancer therapy, i.e. using historical or empirical data to formulate models.

Keywords

Label Index Label Index Tumor Cell Coloni Single Tumor Cell Microscope Lamp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Kallman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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