Effects of Naloxone on ICP and Systemic Cardiovascular Responses After Experimental Closed Head Injury in the Cat

  • R. L. Hayes
  • B. J. Galinat
  • D. Stalhammar
  • D. P. Becker
Conference paper

Abstract

Naloxone has been reported to reduce hypotension produced by endotoxins (Holaday and Faden 1978, Janssen and Lutherer 1980, Reynolds et al. 1980), hemorrhage (Faden and Holaday 1979, Feuerstein et al. 1980, Vargish et al. 1980), or spinal cord transection (Holaday and Faden, 1980). Naloxone has also been reported to improve the neurological outcome in cats after compression injury to the spinal cord (Faden et al. 1981). Hypotension is also observed in a significant percentage of human head-injured patients and is correlated with poor clinical outcomes (Miller et al. 1981). Similarly, high levels of experimental brain injury in cats result in hypotension. Thus, we investigated the consequences of naloxone administration on changes in intracranial pressure (ICP), cardiovascular responses, electroencephalographic activity (EEG) and arterial blood gas status seen after fluid-percussion brain injury in cats.

Keywords

Ischemia Bicarbonate Dura Naloxone Methohexital 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Hayes
    • 1
  • B. J. Galinat
    • 1
  • D. Stalhammar
    • 1
  • D. P. Becker
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurological Surgery, Department of SurgeryMedical College of VirginiaRichmondUSA

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