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The Effects of Mannitol on Intracranial Pressure, Cerebral Perfusion Pressure and Cerebral Blood Flow in Head Injury

  • A. D. Mendelow
  • T. Russell
  • J. Patterson
  • G. Teasdale
Conference paper

Abstract

The clinical usefulness of mannitol in head-injured patients is controversial. On the one hand, large multicentre studies have shown that the routine use of mannitol did not improve the outcome in head injury (Jennett et al. 1980). On the other hand, a single bolus of mannitol has been shown to increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) and to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP) (Bruce et al. 1973). In patients with severe head injury we have studied the effect of a single bolus of mannitol on ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and CBF, in order to relate these changes to the type of injury and the degree of intracranial hypertension.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Head Injury Intracranial Pressure Cerebral Perfusion Pressure Severe Head Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Mendelow
    • 1
  • T. Russell
    • 1
  • J. Patterson
    • 1
  • G. Teasdale
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Neurological SciencesSouthern General HospitalGlasgowUK

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