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Animal Models in Hepatitis Research

  • S. M. Lemon

Abstract

In man, acute viral hepatitis is commonly caused by at least three antigenically and biologically distinct viruses (for a general review, see Koff [1]). Type A hepatitis, previously referred to as short-incubation or infectious hepatitis, occurs as a result of infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV), a small, 27 nM RNA virus with many features in common with picornaviruses. The virus is spread primarily by the fecal-oral route and hepatitis A occurs both sporadically and in epidemics. As with other human hepatitis agents, infection with HAV may result in either no symptoms, typical acute viral hepatitis, or occasionally fulminant and fatal disease. Persistent infections and chronic hepatic disease have not been related to HAV infection.

Keywords

Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus NANB Hepatitis Infected Chimpanzee Hepatitis Research Typical Acute Viral Hepatitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Lemon
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Virus Diseases, Division of Communicable Diseases and ImmunologyWalter Reed Army Institute of ResearchUSA

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