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Antigen Specificity of Continuous T Cell Lines

  • J. F. A. P. Miller
  • P. L. Mottram
  • W. R. Thomas
  • J. McKimm-Breschkin
  • I. L. Walker
  • J. Gamble
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 100)

Abstract

T cells are an extremely heterogeneous population composed of various subsets which interact in a complex manner during an immune response. Furthermore each T cell expresses an antigen-specific receptor unique in its discriminating capacity and in its restriction by gene products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The availability of defined T cell clones should help elucidate the nature of T cell specificity and the function of particular T cells in immune circuits. We have produced T cell lines either by growing T cells from immune mice with antigen, antigen-presenting cells (APC) and T cell growth factors (interleukin-2, IL-2), or by immortalizing T cells after fusing them to T lymphoma cell lines. Some of the results obtained in this work are summarized here.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Major Histocompatibility Complex Restriction Picryl Chloride Abelson Murine Leukemia Abelson Murine Leukemia Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. F. A. P. Miller
  • P. L. Mottram
  • W. R. Thomas
  • J. McKimm-Breschkin
  • I. L. Walker
  • J. Gamble

There are no affiliations available

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