Criteria for the Choice of Drugs Suitable for Controlled Hypotension in Neuroanaesthesia

  • D. Heuser
  • P. J. Morris
  • D. G. McDowall
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Neurosurgery book series (NEURO, volume 10)

Abstract

Controlled hypotension for the improvement of intraoperative conditions is able to minimize operative blood loss, operative time and mortality as well as contributing to a shorter course of disease in patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. Besides volatile anaesthetic agents (e.g. halothane), two groups of chemical substances are commonly used, which achieve low pressure conditions, either via a direct relaxing effect on vascular smooth muscle cells or by blocking ganglia belonging to the autonomic nervous system. In order to meet the essential requirements of the anaesthetist confronted with critical intraoperative conditions, the drug producing hypotension should ideally have the following basic properties:
  1. 1.

    easy to control,

     
  2. 2.

    no increase of intracerebral blood volume,

     
  3. 3.

    short half-life,

     
  4. 4.

    no change in cerebral blood flow (CSF) autoregulation,

     
  5. 5.

    no toxicity.

     

Keywords

Toxicity Ischemia Bromide Polyethylene Cyanide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Heuser
  • P. J. Morris
  • D. G. McDowall

There are no affiliations available

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