The Anatomy of Growth and Its Relation to Locomotor Capacity in Macaca

  • T. I. Grand
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

To the problems of growth I bring the attitudes and methods of an anatomist. In the past, I have compared adult forms of many genera, various size classes, and differing locomotor patterns (Grand 1977a, 1978). Here I concentrate on rhesus macaques (Macaca mülatta) of several size classes and levels of locomotor skill.

Keywords

Migration Fractionation Crest Alan Amenorrhea 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. I. Grand
    • 1
  1. 1.Oregon Regional Primate Research CenterBeavertonUSA

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