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Progress in Acute Myeologenous Leukemia

  • T. A. Lister
  • S. A. N. Johnson
  • R. Bell
  • G. Henry
  • J. S. Malpas
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 26)

Abstract

Experimental and potentially life threatening combination chemotherapy has been used for the induction of remission of acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) for a little over 10 years. During that time the proportion of patients entering remission has risen from less than a quarter to approaching three-quarters. Furthermore, there is now evidence to suggest that about one-fifth of those now entering remission will remain disease free for more than 3 years and be “at risk for cure”.

Keywords

Complete Remission Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia None None Complete Remission Rate Cytosine Arabinoside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. A. Lister
  • S. A. N. Johnson
  • R. Bell
  • G. Henry
  • J. S. Malpas

There are no affiliations available

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