Image Processing and Displays

  • A. S. Houston
Conference paper

Summary

We have compared various image-processing and display methods used in nuclear medicine. The technique of superimposing computer-simulated tumours onto normal clinical data was used in an effort to achieve both clinical relevance and knowledge of “truth”.

A series of 100 clinically normal brain scintigrams were selected from departmental records and 50 “mathematical tumours” simulated and added at clinically relevant positions, no more than one per view. The series was distributed to hospitals active in the field.

The survey involved seven hospitals, 25 observers, and 48 methods of generating the display, including analogue display on X-ray film and Polaroid, and digital display on colour and black-and-white television, electrostatic printer-plotter, and storage display oscilloscope. Experimental techniques used included Latin square ordering of data to study the effect of learning.

A simple rating system was used by each observer to classify the degree of abnormality in each image. Receiver operating characteristic curves (involving lesion localissation) were used to analyse the results. A points system, based on a very simple cost-benefit analysis, was also adopted.

The experiment was then repeated using five observers and 12 display methods for a series of 100 normal liver scintigrams including 50 with superimposed “cold spots”.

The major conclusions were that interpolated data and analogue displays performed well, that enhancement and convexity filters tended to improve observer performance, and that the role of learning should always be considered in surveys of this type.

Keywords

Radionuclide IAEA 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. S. Houston
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineR.N.H. HaslarGosport, HantsUK

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