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Pharmacogenetics and Ecogenetics

The Problem and Its Scope
  • A. G. Motulsky
Part of the Human Genetics, Supplement book series (HUMAN GENETICS, volume 1)

Abstract

Pharmacogenetics started in the mid-1950’s with the demonstration that two unrelated drug reactions were caused by different genetically determined biochemical aberrations: pseudocholinesterase variation as the cause of suxamethonium sensitivity and abnormalities in red cell glutathione metabolism as an explanation for primaquine sensitivity. Genetic differences in acetylation of INH were shown soon thereafter. Impressed by these developments, I pointed out the relevance of genetic variation in the elucidation of drug reactions and Vogel coined the term pharmacogenetics (see Motulsky, 1972, for references).

Keywords

Normal Distribution Curve Genetic Concept Potential Biologic Effect Drug Metabolism Study Level Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Motulsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and Genetics, and Center for Inherited DiseasesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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