Sequential Changes of Regional Cerebral Circulation in Cerebral Infarction

  • K. Uemura
  • K. Goto
  • K. Ishii
  • Z. Ito
  • R. Hen
  • H. Kawakami
Conference paper

Summary

Sequential changes of regional cerebral circulation and effects of spontaneous recanalization of occluded artery on cerebral circulation were observed in 50 patients with cerebral infarction. 1) Luxury perfusion was predominantly recognized in the recanalized patients within 16 days after onset. 2) Impairment of vasomotor responses was almost the same in the recanalized patients and the occluded patients. 3) CO2 response tended to recover about 3–4 weeks after onset, but disautoregulation to induced hypertension persisted up to 2 months after onset. Some clinical problems are discussed.

Keywords

Dioxide Ischemia Amide Angiotensin Neurol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Uemura
    • 1
  • K. Goto
    • 1
  • K. Ishii
    • 1
  • Z. Ito
    • 2
  • R. Hen
    • 2
  • H. Kawakami
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of RadiologyResearch Institute of Brain and Blood VesselsAkita City, AkitaJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryAkitaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Internal MedicineAkitaJapan

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