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The Cyclopentenyl Fatty Acids

  • H. K. Mangold
  • F. Spener

Abstract

The seeds of a great number of shrubs and trees belonging to the plant family Flacourtiaceae contain lipids that are characterized by their constituent cyclopentenyl fatty acids [25, 34, 47]. The oils extracted from Hydnocarpus Kurzii and Caloncoba echinata, called chaulmoogra oil and gorli oil, respectively, as well as those obtained from other Flacourtiaceae species, have been used for centuries in the treatment of leprosy [47]. Table 1 summarizes the systematic names of some members of the family Flacourtiaceae together with the names of the oils obtained from seeds of these plants. Also listed are some of the countries in which these plants are indigenous and those in which they have
Table 1

Some oils producing cyclopentenyl fatty acids [47]

Species

Occurrence

Name of oil

Hydnocarpus anthelminthica

Laos

Lukrabo oil

 

Thailand

 
 

Vietnam

 
 

Ceylona

 
 

Ugandaa

 
 

U.S.A. (Hawaii)a

 

H. Kurzii (Taraktogenos Kurzii)

Bangladesh

Chaulmoogra oil

 

Burma

 
 

India (Assam)

 
 

Ceylona

 
 

Brazil (Minas Gerais)a

 
 

U.S.A. (Hawaii)a

 

Caloncoba echinata

Guinea

Gorli oil

 

Ivory Coast

 
 

Senegal

 
 

Sierra Leone

 
 

Brazil (Sao Paulo)a

 
 

Cubaa

 

Carpotroche brasiliensis

Brazil (Bahia)

Sapocainha oil

 

(Espirito Santo)

 
 

(Minas Gerais)

 
 

(Piaui)

 
 

(Rio de Janeiro)

 
 

(Sao Paulo)

 

a Introduced and cultivated

been introduced for cultivation on a large scale. For a review on the older literature on oils containing cyclopentenyl fatty acids the reader is referred to Ref. [47].

Keywords

Methyl Ester Acyl Carrier Protein Macrocyclic Lactone Countercurrent Distribution Constituent Fatty Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. K. Mangold
  • F. Spener

There are no affiliations available

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