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Trends in the Development of Permanent Ceramic Implants

  • A. Engelhardt
  • H. Grell
  • D. Komitowski
  • H. Scharbach
  • W. Heipertz
  • M. Sencar
  • D. Kooke
  • J. Zeitz
  • P. Bunz

Abstract

Permanent implants are being used with increasing regularity to replace defective parts of the human skeleton. By this increasing number of implantations, especially in the hip region, the advantages and limits of endoprosthetics are disclosed. The primary objective of our investigations is to increase the biocompatibility of a skeletal replacement part. The term “biocompatibility” expresses the degree of adaptive interaction between the implant and biological tissue (Fig. 1). Therefore, it is not sufficient either to change only a few constructive details, use improved materials, or apply different surgical procedures or therapies. All conceivable parameters must be considered. Corrosion and metallosis, different E-moduli, alteration of plastics in the sense of water absorption, aging, volume variations, exothermic heat reaction, and liberation of monomers represent negative factors of today’s endoprosthetics. The same is true concerning the neglecting of biomechanical laws.

Keywords

Bone Cement Resection Plane Skeletal Part Secondary Fixation Permanent Implant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Engelhardt
  • H. Grell
  • D. Komitowski
  • H. Scharbach
  • W. Heipertz
  • M. Sencar
  • D. Kooke
  • J. Zeitz
  • P. Bunz

There are no affiliations available

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