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Teratology pp 121-135 | Cite as

Teratological Investigations in Laboratory Primates: Why, When and How to Use Them

  • D. E. Poswillo
  • I. R. Phillips

Abstract

The value of using laboratory animals to predict the teratogenicity of drugs or chemicals in man is not yet certain. Nonetheless a great deal of time and money is devoted annually to exercises of this kind. For reasons of economy and availability laboratory rodents and lagomorphs are the most favoured species for this work, and the susceptibility of these lower mammals to the teratogenic effects of a large number of compounds in common use is undisputed. A dilemma arises when attempts are made to assess whether evidence of teratogenicity in rats, mice, hamsters and rabbits has any special relevance to similar situations in man. Many attempts have been made to resolve these problems of extrapolation (WHO, 1967); it has been argued, for example, that on the basis of phylogenetic similarity, simian primates should be employed for the screening of compounds that may be teratogenic in man. While such reasoning may appear logical, there is little reliable data, from scientific investigations, to confirm or deny this suggestion (Tuchmann-Duplessis, 1972).

Keywords

World Monkey Tubal Ovum Treacher Collins Syndrome Laboratory Primate Simian Primate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. E. Poswillo
  • I. R. Phillips

There are no affiliations available

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