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Erythrocytic Series

A — Normal Cells
  • Marcel Bessis
Chapter

Abstract

The erythrocytic series consists of a succession of cells which begins with a pronormoblast and ends with the erythrocyte or red blood cell.

Keywords

Hemolytic Anemia Soret Band Hereditary Spherocytosis Heinz Body Ferritin Molecule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Selected Bibliography

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Tomatocytes

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcel Bessis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of MedicineParisFrance
  2. 2.Institute for Cell Pathology (INSERM 48)Hospital of BicêtreParisFrance

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